Running a Careers Department in a Pandemic

I was lucky enough to have a covid free Christmas in our household which meant slightly less running around after everyone and gave me time to sit and think. Everyone has been pushing themselves to their absolute limits over the past couple of years as they attempt to juggle everything, at work and at home, […]

I was lucky enough to have a covid free Christmas in our household which meant slightly less running around after everyone and gave me time to sit and think. Everyone has been pushing themselves to their absolute limits over the past couple of years as they attempt to juggle everything, at work and at home, and teaching has been at the forefront of the media for praise and abuse. I started teaching in 2009 and whilst every year has its challenges the past two years have really trumped anything I could have imagined. I have taught in different settings during my time, worked with some wonderful people and taught many amazing students and it is definitely true that the tough times really do help you to build some bonds that last. 

 

Last year I completed my Careers Leader training, even though I have been a Careers Leader on and off for over 10 years. This training gave me the chance to reflect on how much there is to this role but also how central relationships are to it. Without the support of many of my wonderful contacts throughout so many organisations it would not have been possible to support our students to explore the world of work whilst those who are of working age are living through, what is most likely, one of the craziest and most unpredictable times in their working life. As people are working from home and businesses are closing down, how can we provide students with an immersive experience of the workplace and if we can’t provide this, how do we substitute it? Is this immersive experience still necessary? Is what employers need from their future employees changing? We have to be open to holding these discussions and inviting everyone to take part in these discussions to make sure that what we are providing meets the needs of everyone. 

 

I am so incredibly grateful for the support of B4 members, and Richard Rosser, who have helped me to begin to understand these challenges and explore how business and schools can really work together to produce the workforce that our labour market needs. Now is the time for companies to link with schools and to work with Careers Leaders to produce a well-rounded education for our students which is no longer pushing all students to tick the same boxes but celebrating their differences and helping them to find a path which fits those differences. 

 

If you are interested in being part of this discussion and helping Europa School lead the way and push our unique approach to learning please do get in touch with me. We love to chat and figure out how we can make a difference. 

 

Note about Europa

* All through school (4-18) 

* Opened in September 2012 with reception and Year 1 and 2, a new school year was added each September until 2017 when the whole of secondary was incorporated

*Primary phase children are taught via two languages, English for 2.5 days and either French, German or Spanish for the remainder of the week.

*Secondary students study for the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (Years 7-11)  and complete Diploma Programme at sixth form, the broad curriculum includes the compulsory study of mathematics, science, languages, English and humanities.

 

Links

Ofsted Inspection Report December 5th and 6th December 2018

Europa School UK website

 

Contact Lynn Wood for more information – l.wood@europaschool.uk

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